75 in ’13: Hallow’en Party

2 SPOOPY 4 U.

2 SPOOPY 4 U.

For the sixty-third book in the challenge, I read Hallowe’en Party by Agatha Christie, the thirty-sixth book in the Hercule Poirot series (according to GoodReads, anyway).

This is a short story, and Hastings is off gallivanting elsewhere, so we see things first from Ariadne Oliver’s point of view, though not in first person. She happens to be visiting someone when something awful happens, and she sends for Poirot to get to the bottom of things. Ariadne may not have Poirot’s mind, but she’s no slouch when it comes to little gray cells; she’s a famous author, after all, and she too understands the many reasons why a person might do something horrible to another. She also has a good nose for recognizing when something isn’t right; that is, the situation is more complicated than it seems, or when something is distinctly not an accident, or when something needs more scrutiny, though she can’t always articulate why she thinks so.

Because we follow Poirot around as he makes his inquiries, we see more of his thought process than usual, and I actually wished to have someone else between Poirot and myself. It was a bit too real of a characterization to see him at a loss, to be uncertain which direction to pursue, to understand that his stillness and his bluster can exist in the same soul. While it is lovely that Christie rounds out Poirot more than she has in the past, I wasn’t expecting it at all.

Still, it’s a decent story and while at first I was like:

pumpkinmandance1

pumpkinmandance2

pumpkinmandance3

pumpkinmandance4

 

by the end I was like:

2spooky

Well, sorta.

(This was definitely not an excuse to use the dancing pumpkin man .gifs some other month than October. Mm-mm. Nope.)

Oh yeah, I gave the story 3 out of 5 stars.

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About crankyfacedknitter

We are a motley collection of cats, cranks, nerds, geeks, hobbyists, humorists, writers, caffeine addicts and one knitter. We have many offspring, but admittedly, most of them are imaginary.
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